It is common to hear about postpartum depression, but the pregnant woman is also at risk of falling into depression during pregnancy.  Several studies corroborate that having a history of severe depression or premenstrual syndrome irritability, mood swings, fluid retention, bloating and abdominal discomfort, increases the risk of depression in pregnancy.

pregnant woman

Depression

  • The age at which pregnancy occurs, the younger the risk not having a stable partner or having marital problems
  • Having more children, the more children you have the greater the risk of depression in subsequent pregnancies.
  • Experience ambivalent feelings about pregnancy to be stressed.
  • The very anxiety resulting from pregnancy and disadvantages, weight gain and other physical changes can increase the risk of depression
  • Also the risk of relapse or worsening when there has been a previous depression.
  • In addition, depression during pregnancy increases the risk of postpartum depression.

How to treat depression in pregnancy

Psychologists specializing in pregnancy and maternity issues recommend: Take care of one’s own health. The pregnant woman who takes care of herself takes care of her baby too.  Paying attention to the physical aspect, pregnancy is not a license for abandonment. Discuss concerns with family, friends or trusted people. Consult the GP, gynecologist or obstetrician about the advisability of following some psychological therapy.

Dedicate time each day to leisure or some activity that we like especially. Surround yourself with positive people and run away from toxic companies. Make life outdoors and devote half an hour a day to physical exercise. Consult your doctor about the advisability of using some medication for depression, and ask about the risks and benefits of it. At adequate doses and cases, many of the current antidepressant drugs are safe during pregnancy at least for short-term effects on the fetus the long-term effects have not yet been properly studied.

Perhaps the most important thing is to remember that depression can interfere with the ability of the pregnant woman to take adequate care of her for example, she may eat or sleep worse and not go to the check-ups and visits indicated. In addition, depressive states increase the risk of consuming tobacco, alcohol or narcotics, just the least when a child is being born.

 

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It is common to hear about postpartum depression, but the pregnant woman is also at risk of falling into depression during pregnancy.  Several studies corroborate that having a history of severe depression or premenstrual syndrome irritability, mood swings, fluid retention, bloating and abdominal discomfort, increases the risk of depression...